Monthly Archives: September 2016

Book: Essentialism by Greg McKeown

clip_image002Not sure – throw it out.

Pascal Dennis.

What should I eat to lose weight?

Usual dietary question

The next book is not about doing stuff. It’s about not doing stuff. Yep. The author tells us that the only way to be really successful is to choose what not to do. You know what? I totally agree.

WE

CANNOT

DO

EVERYTHING.

Like in “quit saying yes”. Because if you take on every challenge you meet, then you face “priorities”. And it is quite new a word: you haven’t seen much of it before, say, XV or even XIX century. Before that it was only one priority in every situation. That’s very close to what I believe my tasks may be divided on:

· Do it right now (only one task).clip_image003

· Do it one day (many other tasks).

· Don’t do it (the more tasks, the better).

So, chose what you want to do, set your priority and don’t touch anything else.

Brilliant idea, isn’t it? Of course there are some tough spots. Say, I decided to sell something I don’t need. And 5 years later the spot shows the Fountain of Youth in it. Wouldn’t it be awful?!

But still, I see application for this. Moreover, some things I do in my job (though, I definitely need to improve the practice). Say, if I’m working on something and someone is requiring my time, but cannot say that his deal is urgent, then I’m just saying “I’ll call you later”. There is, for sure, one important ingredient in this: I will really call them. =) And your “no” shouldn’t translate into “get lost”. It may, if you wish, but it’s usually unnecessary.

So, I definitely approve the approach. I just need to think of what and how to do with it, because the book isn’t a text book. It’ more a manifesto, then a manual.

There are useful things, like zero-based budgeting: you don’t look what you planned yesterday to do today, you just gather as many commitments for today as you possibly can do. First – what is more important. And if all the important stuff doesn’t find the room in your day – you must not plan for it (remember: 24 hours a day minus 8 hours for sleep minus 8 hours for work minus 2 hours for food minus several hours for commute minus… your day is one small amount of time!). You may plan as your next absolutely important goal (only one priority, remember?) increasing your performance, but never try to do twice as much as you really can.

Yep, important stuff is all over the book. But remember how I just told you it’s not a textbook or manual? The structure of the book is weak and it has little instruments to start with. At least, I see it this way: you’ll have motivation from the book, but it’s up to you, how to apply this motivation to your life. There are some advices, but they either don’t have anything to do with essentialism, or are trivial, or plain impossible to do. Example? Easy. Suppose you are a perfectionist. You’re trying to make a report, and, sure enough, the report must be perfect. And you have dozens ideas how to improve it. But right now you have to do at least a draft to start with. But you cannot, because “draft” is opposite to “perfect”. And you’re just stuck! What should you do? Greg suggests that you just change your motto from “perfect or nothing” to “better something than nothing”. Easy like that! Just change your core idea, what you really are to the opposite and it will solve everything. You have two minutes, I believe it will be enough.

And one exceptionally bad in most corporate environments advice: put at least 50% time buffer in everything you do. Ok, the task should last a day. I’m adding a day more, to create the buffer, my boss adds 1 more day for his buffer and his boss adds 2 more days “just in case”. Now we have 5 days for the task which lasts a day. And, considering the student syndrome, it’ll probably last 6 to 7 days, actually. I’m far from saying that buffers are unnecessary, but in complex environments they should be controlled so that no such chain effect occurs.

So, the book is ok if we consider it a motivational manifesto and not trying play it as a textbook. The author even put some Theory of constraints passages into it, and it’s nowadays almost a quality sign 😉

Usefulness: slightly above average. I’d prefer more instrumental book. Still it’s the vNext idea for me.

книга полезность выше среднего

 

 

Is it easy for reading? Yes. There is a bit more pathos then I’d like, but it’s ok.

книга нормально читается

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Book: Lean production simplified by Pascal Dennis

imageLet’s start from the end: I haven’t reached it. Yep, one more book I haven’t read cover-to-cover. I’ve just made a new category for such books in the blog.

I’m interested in the Lean Manufacturing topic, and I heard something about it, but still, I don’t know how to DIY. That’s why I started reading such books. But this one – I failed with it. Why? Well, the book seems awkward to me. It creates questions but doesn’t answer them. Probably, I just don’t know enough, or I know too much, who knows. Anyway, I still see what’s different in my job from what’s described in the book, but don’t see what’s similar.

The book is not a 101 course, because it’s full of details and lacks some “executive overview”. Say, we now know about using sensors in some situations to control production flow, how to place them and what algorithm to use. And in the same book we just use some terms without explaining them. Explaining, what we can do if our situation is a bit different (say, we spent little time producing the product, but do it rarely) – ha! – no way. That is – a lot of details, but little rules of the system.

The book isn’t a reference book either, because it’s not detailed enough. Or details aren’t in the place we’d like them. Say, we’re talking about obligatory 5S learning course:

·         Team members: 2 hours

·         People, accountable for 5S: 1 day

·         Masters and managers: 1 day.

What is the course agenda, what this time should consist of – never mind, you won’t find it. We know only that it’s “5S intro” and “5S implementation”. As a result, the whole piece of information is absolutely useless.

I also find it funny, that we should learn some Japanese words. Like in “Muda is a Japanese word youimage have to learn”. How sweet. Since that’s what I definitely can live without, it’s… How you name it? Ahhh – Muda! =)

Long story short, I had been trying for almost 2/3 of the book, but then I quit and some of my questions still lie unanswered:

·         What’s supplies and overproduction in work of system engineers?

·         What are machines in my case?

·         Probably, machines are my servers and production is just fulfilling users’ requests (http for web, JSON or some other stuff for other services, etc.)? And then my guys are really engineers who just readjust the equipment. Each release is a readjustment. And so is plain reconfiguration?

·         How do we use 5S for servers?

·         What is our product?

·         What is transportation for me?

And many others. Just like I said: too many questions about how are we different. So, what should I read next on the topic? And what books I shouldn’t waste my time on? =)

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Usefulness: low. Books should not only question you, but answer some questions, too.

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Is it easy for reading: no, I never finished it.