Book: Pinball Effect by James Burke

clip_image002Apples and oranges

-Just regular someone

A friend of mine recommended the book to me to find out what analogies, stories and other artifacts I can include in my future presentations or trainings to make them more interesting, dynamic and vivid. I’m dead serious about recommendations by certain people, so I ordered the book, waited for it (it happened to be cheaper to buy it from American store with delivery to Russia in English, than to buy a translated version here 😉 ) and read it. So much for veni, vidi, vici nowadays, huh.

First of all, I cannot recommend the book for any other reason than what I wrote: just look at variety of stories to enrich your ability to find something related to the current situation. Because, while there is certainly a lot of stories, the connections promised the author are sometimes… Well… They just aren’t. 🙂 Like the connection between some events is that they happened in one country. And some reviews suggest that James wasn’t too scrupulous with the facts either.

Anyway, there were some interesting points, which may illustrate some opinion. Even if the illustration itself isn’t true. Like analogy, you know. Say, story of Quakers may illustrate the fact that not all our actions yield results we intended. After the Restoration according to Burke (I’m not aware of the details, probably I now have to read something on the subject) they were banished from almost all professions except production and commerce. I believe, the aim was to handicap and impair their influence. Try and guess, who was the most powerful in those two remaining spheres of business soon.

One more interesting interconnection relates to phrenology. I’m not interested in the pseudo-science, but the author says that it stimulated a surge of self-improvement literature (And just look at our books stores now. It looks familiar, doesn’t it?). But what is more interesting: the passion for this baloney seemingly helped to deliver the criminalistics as we know it today.

clip_image004 Utility: low. I liked reading such stories in my childhood, but they were better structured and bore more information

 

clip_image006 Readability: low. I’m not native reader, but there are books that are easy to read. This one isn’t. The connections aren’t that obvious, you’ll be losing where the heck have you jumped from long bows to DNA.

Buy: Nah… Wouldn’t recommend Winking smile

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