Monthly Archives: June 2016

To send or not to send

clip_image002[7]

An email which is timely not sent is worth ten emails sent at wrong time.

Me.

Recently, my colleague and I delivered a lecture about personal productivity to other our colleagues. It is based on a course of my friend, and has this slide in it:

clip_image004[5]

It is (in turn) based on Tim Urban theory about procrastination, but in this particular case is describing what our internal monkey may do with our regular work if we don’t formulate it good enough, or if we otherwise give it too much of free action time.

After that we showed that however hard and unpleasant it is, we can wake up our consciousness if:

1) we want to

2) we have enough time.

And the situation, like pictured in the slide, can be resolved quite easy. I saw the recipe so many times all over the internet, so I was blown away discovering that so many people in my audience don’t know about that trick. And almost no one uses it! And almost all of them do such mistakes from time to time.

What is the trick? That’s easy: delay sending your email. I know how to do it in MS Office Outlook. I know that the similar (but more simple) option presents in Gmail, and I know that there is not such option in Outlook.com. So choose wisely =)

What it does for us? It gives our intelligence time to take over steering controls from the monkey. And write “I don’t completely agree” instead of “you’re an idiot”. Or if you are naturally polite (which I am not), you may remember that not every person needs receive the letter just because you’ve hit “reply all”. Anything can happen if you take just several seconds to reflect on your latest action. Anything.

And here is how to configure it in Outlook 2016 and Gmail.

P.S. I was speaking about video with raccoon and cotton candy in the lecture. Here it is.

DO

NOT

WATCH

IT

DURING

YOUR

WORKDAY

Advertisements

Books I failed to read

clip_image002Once you start a book, you should finish it

Some columnist I’m not sure I agree with

You already got, I believe, that I read and sometimes write about books I like. Or don’t like for that matter. But there is a whole lot of books my kung fu isn’t strong enough for me to finish reading at all. Remembering a discussion after one of my previous blogs, I’ll be as direct as I can. I don’t mean that they are bad. I mean that they didn’t start my thinking process. Or they just wearied me too much to continue reading for one reason or another. I don’t even think that it’s a good habit: quit reading before “The End”. It’s a new behavior for me because most books I read from start to finish, bored I am or no.

But in some cases I am not ready for the book. Say, a problem the book is about doesn’t appeal to me, or I know too much about it, or too little, or something. Sometimes I cannot bear the style. In some rare cases I just disagree so much that reading on is too hard for me. There is so many books I like or think they are useful for me. Not reading them while I’m struggling with the boring one is like betrayal. It looks like wasting my time.
What are the books I couldn’t read? The list isn’t complete, of course, but I am an absolute sucker when quitting reading. So, meet my “haven’t enough guts for them” list:
Daniel Goleman: Primal leadership. This one happened to get into my hands just too early. Or I’m unable to be emotionally intelligent. I’ll get back to it soon and try it once more. Still, a couple years ago it was too complex and provided no immediate and practical connection to my life and its problems.

Stephen Covey: 7 habits of highly effective people. Nah… I told you already: the book “7 reasons you aren’t the people I’m writing about”. Or some other reason. I just couldn’t interest myself enough in it. I believe it could be still useful and it’s just me. It is possible you should try it, though.
Steve Pavlina: Personal Development for Smart People. Same as above.
Danielle Laporte: The Desire Map: A Guide to Creating Goals With Soul. I like the idea (as I understand it from about 1/3 I read). But the style just freaks me out. Can’t read the text. But again, the idea resonated with me well.
Danny Penman & Mark Williams: Mindfulness. A Practical Guide to Finding Peace in a Frantic World. Let’s say, I’m not into meditation. I tried two weeks of the eight-week course, suggested in the book. No fool. They haven’t brought me any new knowledge or sensation. Some of the ideas aren’t new to me. Like monitoring how you’re thinking and switching from an idea to a thought. That’s some stuff you learn in Russian army while being a sentry. 😉
Aron Ralston: Between a Rock and a Hard Place. Not business or self-help book at any rate but not fiction. Just a man who had been once stupid wrote a book about how stupid he had been. A Saga of Stupidity. Reading it is unbearable to me, so I dropped it.
And what books you haven’t finished? What seemed stupid or was not worth it?

Cannot draw? Doodle: A place to learn how to do it.

clip_image002[5]Do you have hands? Excellent. That’s a good start. Can you hold a pencil? Great. If you have a sketchbook, open it and start by making a line, a mark, wherever. Doodle.

Chris Riddell

Some time ago I decided that it’d be great if I will learn how to draw. Ok, not like “DRAW” draw, more like doodle. Sticky man and all that stuff. Why? Well, first of all, just because. I saw some beautiful stuff around me. Like Simon’s cat. And that’s bringing some envy to my life. Second, it now means I don’t have to look for stock photo for my blog, worry about copyright and all that stuff. Believe me or not, it’s important for me somehow. And there is, as I like to mention, this particularly unpleasant German guy… Whatshisname… Ahhh – Alzheimer. 😉 So, some researchers tell us that you may have less chances to meet him, if you’re doing something new. And believe me: drawing for me is NEW!

My next step was to try and doodle something. Nope. Didn’t work for two reasons. First, I didn’t know what to draw to illustrate my thoughts. And second, when I tried it looked… Well… Even worse than it does now. Here is an example:

clip_image004[5]

While you definitely may (I hope) distinguish a rake here, I’m not that sure about a precision axe attached to it. Not that if I draw it today it will be much more understandable, but it will look better.

So: I don’t know what and I don’t know how. That’s the place to start. What should one do in such a situation? Find a training and go through it. And I did exactly what I said: found a training named IQ Doodle by Adam Sicinski. It’s a 40-day course over which Adam walks you through the basics of doodling, shows what and how you can do and challenges you to do more, better and faster. Actually, it took me much more than 40 days to finish it, and guess what? After the 40th day, Adam continues to send some materials. Not sure when he stops, but at the moment almost 200 things are waiting for me to doodle them.

Anyway, while I’m not able to draw even half as well as a child of a friend of mine, I’m even right now have switched in my blog posts from internet borrowed pictures to what I created myself. I’ll be putting some memes here, of course, some books covers, or maybe some other pictures if it feels right. But otherwise it’s already my own “handmade”. And I like it more than before 😉

I’m not into explaining and discussing in detail, what the course is. I’ll just show you one of the challenges. Adam suggests that someone is drawing some figure. Anything: just a line, a circle, or any scribble. And you should draw a face around it.

A friend of mine (who happened to start the course with me) and I tried it and here are some of the results:

clip_image006[5]

And the second example:

clip_image008[5]

My favorite is the cat on the first page. The guy doodled it from something like that:

clip_image010[5]

Unbelievable level of imagination if you ask me. But then another wild person appeared and made us both ashamed with this:

clip_image012[6]

Anyway, from now on you’re bound to tolerate my doodling in the blog posts, unless you just unsubscribe. 😉 And you may sign up for the course, too: it’s free and it’ll do you good if you’re as bad at doodling as I am.

Book: Pinball Effect by James Burke

clip_image002Apples and oranges

-Just regular someone

A friend of mine recommended the book to me to find out what analogies, stories and other artifacts I can include in my future presentations or trainings to make them more interesting, dynamic and vivid. I’m dead serious about recommendations by certain people, so I ordered the book, waited for it (it happened to be cheaper to buy it from American store with delivery to Russia in English, than to buy a translated version here 😉 ) and read it. So much for veni, vidi, vici nowadays, huh.

First of all, I cannot recommend the book for any other reason than what I wrote: just look at variety of stories to enrich your ability to find something related to the current situation. Because, while there is certainly a lot of stories, the connections promised the author are sometimes… Well… They just aren’t. 🙂 Like the connection between some events is that they happened in one country. And some reviews suggest that James wasn’t too scrupulous with the facts either.

Anyway, there were some interesting points, which may illustrate some opinion. Even if the illustration itself isn’t true. Like analogy, you know. Say, story of Quakers may illustrate the fact that not all our actions yield results we intended. After the Restoration according to Burke (I’m not aware of the details, probably I now have to read something on the subject) they were banished from almost all professions except production and commerce. I believe, the aim was to handicap and impair their influence. Try and guess, who was the most powerful in those two remaining spheres of business soon.

One more interesting interconnection relates to phrenology. I’m not interested in the pseudo-science, but the author says that it stimulated a surge of self-improvement literature (And just look at our books stores now. It looks familiar, doesn’t it?). But what is more interesting: the passion for this baloney seemingly helped to deliver the criminalistics as we know it today.

clip_image004 Utility: low. I liked reading such stories in my childhood, but they were better structured and bore more information

 

clip_image006 Readability: low. I’m not native reader, but there are books that are easy to read. This one isn’t. The connections aren’t that obvious, you’ll be losing where the heck have you jumped from long bows to DNA.

Buy: Nah… Wouldn’t recommend Winking smile